What can you do for yourself to help prevent diabetes Type 2 – part 2

Sleep well and minimize stress

Getting reduced hours of sleep (less than 7) is associated with higher blood glucose levels and increased risk of high blood pressure. Inappropriate cortisol response will lead to higher baseline glucose, as well. These two factors are linked because the number one reason for not being able to sleep is something called hyper-arousal, from elevated evening cortisol levels. So another factor for helping preventing risk for diabetes is addressing chronic stress and sleep issues.

Medication for prevention?

There are no good drugs developed for the prevention of diabetes, only the treatment of diabetes once you get it. So when you look at all this, there are several important dietary supplements, food ingredients and lifestyle support products that could help create very robust nutrition and lifestyle plans for reducing diabetic risk or making inroads to better blood sugar control like.

Consume essential nutrients on a regular basis

Magnesium and chromium are two essential nutrients that are needed to help glucose handling in the body.

Magnesium

When magnesium levels are inadequate, the ability to make energy at a cellular level comes to a halt. When cells do not make energy efficiently, the demand for fuel (glucose) goes up. Appetite for carbohydrates and sugar will increase to get available fuel ready, but it comes at the cost of pending insulin resistance. This is one of the reasons people with diabetes have a hard time managing their diet. At the cellular level, the message is being sent to the brain to take in more fuel. Research has reported that 500 mg of elemental magnesium per day given to overweight individuals can alter expression of some 60 different genes that control inflammation and glucose related metabolism.

Chromium

This trace mineral is essential to the function of insulin receptors. There have been numerous studies that have shown improved parameters related to glucose regulation in dosages of 1-2 mg per day. Modern diets are poor in chromium content and if someone is beginning to exercise, the loss of chromium is accelerated.